The Growing Need for Information and Cyber Security Professionals

The Growing Need for Information and Cyber Security Professionals

As people rely more heavily on technology to help manage their daily lives, the threat of cybercrime continues to escalate. In recent years, many high-profile data breach cases have made headlines, companies like Boots Advantage Card, Uber and British Airways faced security threats that exposed possibly millions of private information like usernames, passwords, and credit card numbers. As hackers and cybercriminals develop new ways to access sensitive systems and information, even the largest companies must stay vigilant about security vulnerabilities. Information and Cyber Security Professionals are more in demand than ever, and here’s why.

Hackers Are Getting Smarter

Hackers find new ways to access data every day. The role of an Information Security Analyst is to identify security risks before hackers do. They then develop and implement new preventative security controls for defending against cyberattacks. As hackers’ skills become more sophisticated, a growing number of Cyber Security specialists are needed to develop and implement advanced security solutions.

Cybercrime Is Expensive

One reason the Cyber Security field is growing is that most businesses simply can’t afford a data breach. In the UK, the average cost of a data breach has grown to nearly £2.7 million, according to IBM research, and the reputational harm can be incalculable.

Everything Is Automated

As companies’ processes become automated, more of their infrastructure is rooted in technology. Every automated system is created by code that can be accessed when cybercriminals break in. Thus, the more processes that are done digitally, the more opportunities hackers get to steal private information. This is bad news for businesses, but good news for those within Cyber Security, who find an increasing demand for their skills.

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Vulnerabilities Are Everywhere

Hackers aren’t just targeting computers, websites, and servers; any technology based in code offers an opportunity in. From airplane systems and car alarms to power grids and security systems, more products and systems than ever before are at risk for takeover by cybercriminals. Businesses need the best online security professionals to identify and mitigate security threats for every technological innovation.

Career Outlook for Cybersecurity Professionals

These are just a few reasons the Information and Cyber Security field is experiencing such rapid growth. The Bureau of Labour Statistics predicts a 28% increase in the demand for Information Security Analysts between 2016 and 2026—that’s an increase of 28,500 jobs. With demand for Cyber Security professionals at an all-time high, with positions are available in every industry. Via Resource have put together a UK and US salary guide in the Information and Cyber Security industry which you can use as a benchmark. There are a lot of openings in the security profession but the dream list of qualifications they want is either not realistic, or not realistic for the pay grade.

If you’re looking for your next career in Information and Cyber Security, please register with Via Resource today where a consultant will contact you to understand your requirements.

Panaseer Case Study

How to onboard a remote employee successfully

How to onboard a remote employee successfully

Remote employees have gone from being the exception to becoming a major part of the workforce. In fact, by 2025, it is estimated that 70% of the workforce will be working remotely. Therefore, in today’s work environment, it is now essential to hire, onboard, and build trusted teams virtually. Since there is a wealth of skilled talent located around the world, looking beyond borders to accomplish this makes good business sense.

To prepare a new cyber security professionals for success in their role and retain them for the long term, CISOs must collaborate with their HR leaders to carefully plan and diligently execute structured onboarding processes that cover everything from basic new employee paperwork to briefing them on processes and people critical to their long-term job role success.

1. Interview

The traditional office setup to conduct in-person interviews has been replaced with video conferencing software like Zoom and Microsoft Teams. Organisations can use this opportunity to conduct a few different interviews to get to know the candidate better. In addition, video interviews to virtually onboard new talent eliminate the need for travel and can help greatly reduce the overall screening duration. We have a guide on A Virtual Interview Guide For Hiring Managers which will be useful to read.

2. Connection with the team

It can be useful to create a connection to the organisation before the employee’s first day. As soon as a candidate accepts the job offer, it is the perfect opportunity to make them feel a part of the team. For example, sending a care package filled with the company’s products to the new employee’s home.

3. Technology

Offering each new employee, a meeting with IT to show how all platforms like communication channels and company systems work can alleviate first-day anxiety. Which in turn minimises technical issues and allows new employees to be fully present and more comfortable. Organisations can send a new laptop and/or phone before the start date, fully set up with the right company configurations and security protocols. This creates a connection to the organisation and reduces new employee anxiety.

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4. Interaction

Being in the office creates more advantages by allowing unconscious learning and knowledge from colleagues. Replicating this virtually has presented challenges, but it can be tackled effectively by enhancing the onboarding experience for new candidates and keeping the interaction as positive and frequent as possible. When onboarding a new person, check in on them regularly and allow them to ask questions and talk about how they are doing. If you are not able to do this, perhaps assign them a “buddy” within the company, who can act as a sole point of contact for the new candidate.

5. Try to reduce “Zoom fatigue”

In 2020, there was a sudden rush to host regular check-ins and virtual gatherings, until employees were hit by the “Zoom fatigue.” It’s apparent that when the office setup comes home, it brings with it a challenge to balance both work and personal life effectively. Virtual employees often find themselves tangled between the constant notifications, emails, and video calls, and setting the right boundaries for interaction and deep work time can become even more difficult. Therefore, if employees are engaged, they are more likely to report a sense of belonging. Businesses must ensure that virtual employees have a dedicated support system for all levels – right from senior managers to interns. To find what works best for your organisation through listening to your team.

Download our checklist for more information.

Contact us today and see why our information and cyber security recruitment services are trusted by FTSE 100 companies and UK Government Departments.

A virtual interview guide for hiring managers in Information and Cyber Security

A virtual interview guide for hiring managers in Information and Cyber Security

In The Cyber Security Skills Gap And How To Attract Candidates report we have seen 61% of candidates prefer interviews that incorporate phone, video and in-person interviews. According to Forbes, 54% believe virtual interviews resulted in a speedier recruitment process with 41% saying it helped them identify the best candidates, due to accessibility and the option to schedule more interviews in a day. If you’re a hiring manager and want to start using virtual interviews to meet with potential candidates, here are a few tips that can help you be an effective virtual interviewer.

Prepare and test your technology

One of the best ways to help a virtual interview run smoothly is to make sure the technology you plan to use functions correctly. To do so, you can set up the area where you plan to conduct the interview and test each piece of equipment you want to use.

Give clear directions to job candidates

Some virtual interviews might require cyber security candidates to take extra steps to attend, such as creating an account for an application or signing into a virtual waiting room. To help candidates feel prepared and comfortable, provide detailed instructions about what they can do to get ready and take part in the interview.

Calendar invite

As the interviewer and the candidate in a virtual interview are typically in different places, it’s important to make sure everyone remembers the date and time they need to be available. When sending a calendar invitation, include the candidate’s name, email address, date, time, and a link to the meeting.

Prepare your questions beforehand

It’s often a common practice for hiring managers to build a list of questions that they can use during interviews. Ensure questions asked are relatable to the Information and Cyber Security role and ask regarding their past experiences within their previous roles (ensure you look at their CV beforehand to create personalised questions).

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Be transparent throughout

It is key to be transparent throughout the interview process to ensure that a candidate is aware of any information that might affect their decision to accept a job. For example, advertising a position as working from home but wanting to come to the office twice a week. Also mention the key benefits that come with the role, for example working from home, wellness programmes and flexible working hours. Sharing these types of details can build trust and provide candidates with more information about a company.

Highlight your company's culture

Company culture is often an important factor in accepting a job, as they would prefer a work environment that suits their personality. A virtual interview doesn’t allow to physically introduction a candidate to the company’s culture, it is important to talk about it in detail. For example, describing the atmosphere of the office, explaining the company’s values and sharing stories from impactful company events, like fundraisers or team-building events.

Use a rating system

Many hiring managers use virtual interviews because it can allow them to schedule more interviews in a day rather than hosting in-person meetings. Therefore, it can be helpful to establish a rating system for every candidate interviewed. This could include awarding points for specific types of answers or recording whether candidates mention points of expertise or skills. Having a standard rating system that can apply to all candidates can make evaluating them quick and easy, especially if you experience a higher volume of interviews.

Feedback

Feedback for both candidates and companies is important.

    • Candidates – after each interview stage candidates need to receive detailed feedback with 73% of candidates strongly agreeing and 37% agreeing. This is an incredibly important statistic as the importance of employer branding and candidate experience are hugely important in today’s employment market.
    • Clients – encouraging candidates to provide feedback on the virtual interview process can help a hiring manager identify which of their methods is most effective. This will also make candidates feel comfortable during their interviews by showing them that you value their opinions and might improve the quality of future virtual interviews.

Training

It is not common for businesses overall to invest in training for staff in cyber roles (only 24%). However, is it seen that 94% of candidates are happy to take additional training to learn new regulations or skills to enhance their career. If there is an option for training to be provided it is vital to explain this further, for example if it is CISSP or general in-house training.

Next steps

After conducting the virtual interview, it can be important to make sure the candidate is aware of the next steps in the hiring process, especially if they need to take any actions. For example, to submit additional materials or to wait till next week to find out if they are through to the next interview stage.

To prepare a new cyber security professional for success in their role and to retain long term, CISOs must collaborate with their HR leaders to carefully plan and diligently execute structured onboarding processes that cover everything from basic new employee paperwork to briefing them on processes and people critical to their long-term job role success. Here we have put together a checklist on How To Onboard A Remote Employee Successfully to guide you.

Sales and Marketing Salary Guide US and EMEA

Sales and Marketing salary guide US and EMEA 2022

How much should you be paying for a Sales and Marketing professional?

In our latest US and EMEA salary guide, we analyse salary data from multiple data sources overlaid with live market information from our own database and advertised job data.

Our salary bandings are constructed as a guide for the US and EMEA marketplace and are only region specific for the US (East Coast, Central States and West Coast). Living costs, travel expenses and commission have not been taken into consideration for each role. If you require data that aligns to your specific requirements (Region, Technology, Clearance level), please let us know.

Torquil Macleod, Founder and Director of Via Resource comments:

“Our report is the perfect US and EMEA salary benchmarking tools for both employers looking to attract the best employees and workers looking for a new job. We have included the most common sales and marketing job titles and want to ensure clients and candidates receive the best experience possible with quality support, advice and guidance.”

Via Resource salary guide covers the following job roles:

    • Major Account Manager
    • Enterprise Account Manager
    • Territory/Regional Sales Manager
    • Commercial Account Manager
    • Channel Account Manager
    • Chief Revenue Officer (CRO)
    • Vice President of Sales
    • Vice President of Channel Sales
    • Chief Marketing Officer (CMO)
    • Marketing Director
    • Demand Generation Director
    • Field/Channel Marketing Manager
    • Channel Marketing Director

Webinar: Cyber Corner Is It Time For Change In The Information And Cyber Security Industry

Webinar: Cyber Corner Is it Time for Change in the Information and Cyber Security Industry

In our first webinar Steve Arnold, Senior Consultant at Via Resource and Jay Jay Davey, SOC Lead at Cyberclan, spoke about ways in which the industry can change, what is needed to implement these changes, ways in which to progress through the industry without the need for certifications and how you can use Cyber Launchpad and Cyber Mentor Dojo to get your feet on the ladder and launch your career within Cyber Security (or alternatively if you are a hiring manager, find entry-level talent/graduates). 

 

Overview of topics that was discussed: 

    • Areas that are needed to be changed within Cyber 
    • How we can go about these changes 
    • How Cyber Launchpad and Cyber Mentor Dojo can help 
    • The organic journey through Cyber Security without chasing certifications 
    • How people can transition from other areas of IT into Cyber Security

About Steve Arnold, Senior Consultant at Via Resource

Steve joined the Via Resource team in 2021, having spent the last 4 years working solely in the Information/Cyber Security sector recruiting roles such as Information Security Manager, Security Architect, Security Engineers and Security Analysts.

Steve solely focuses on Operational Security positions for Via Resource and has experience managing the end-to-end recruitment process for organisations nationwide with roles ranging from entry-level to C-Suite.

As well as this Steve gained a National Diploma Level 2 and NVQ Level 3 in Recruitment and is CertRP certified.

About Jay Jay Davey, SOC Lead at Cyberclan

Jay Jay makes Security Operations work for businesses; ultimately, technical security goals are driven by risk management. Therefore, helping provide tangible and cost-effective ways to manage technical risk and help protect the value of your business.

Jay Jay has worked with most modern technological security solutions, including but not limited to EDR, SIEM, DLP, Vulnerability scanners, and more. His expertise in this area help manage technical risk, bring visibility and provide metrics for assurance that your technical security is delivering on promises. In addition, working closely with threat intelligence to help build context to alerts and investigations.

Jay Jay has an open perception of problems and understand that not all problems can be solved with flashy solutions or money but requires careful analysis of process output, procedure outcomes, other metrics, and evidence that could highlight an issue that impacts the business. Opinions are of his own and not the views of his employer.

 

Information and Cyber Security Salary Guide Across the US 2022

Information And Cyber Security Salary Guide Across the US 2022

How much should you be paying for a Cyber & Information Security professional?

Download Information and Cyber Security US Salary Guide now

In our latest US salary guide, we analyse salary data from multiple data sources overlaid with live market information from our own database and advertised job data.

Our salary bandings are constructed as a guide for the US marketplace and are specific to East Coast, Central States and West Coast regions. Living costs and travel expenses have to be taken into consideration for each role. If you require data that aligns to your specific requirements (Region, Technology, Clearance level), please let us know.

Download Information and Cyber Security US Salary Guide now

Torquil Macleod, Founder and Director of Via Resource comments:

“Our report is the perfect US salary benchmarking tools for both employers looking to attract the best employees and workers looking for a new job. We have included ten of the most common cyber security job titles and want to ensure clients and candidates receive the best experience possible with quality support, advice and guidance.”

Download Information and Cyber Security US Salary Guide now

Via Resource UK salary guide covers the following job roles:

    • Governance, Risk & Compliance (GRC)
    • Information Security Management
    • Chief Information Security Officer (CISO)
    • Security Operations Centre (SOC) Analyst
    • Security Engineering
    • Security Architecture
    • Cloud Security
    • Application Security
    • DevSecOps
    • Penetration Tester

Download Information and Cyber Security US Salary Guide now

The average US & UK cost of a data breach

The average US & UK cost of a data breach

Now more than ever, organisations should handle the personal data of their customers with care. To complete numerous financial transactions or register for various services, people disclose their private information to organisations with an expectation that they will protect their personal data. Unfortunately, personal information is valuable to malicious adversaries, where criminals cyberattack to access this information. These breaches not only cost millions for companies, but they also result in customers feeling violated. Even the most prominent corporations have experienced data breaches, the brunt of the blame always falls on the company.

The primary consequences of a data breach include:

    • Financial loss
    • Reputational Damage
    • Operational Downtime
    • Legal Action
    • Loss of Sensitive Data

IBM released the Cost of a Data Breach 2021 report, an annual study on the cost of data breaches and the modern threat landscape. The report not only highlighted that the cost of data breaches is on the rise but also showed that enterprises are taking longer to contain security incidents.

Average cost of a US data breach

In the US the overall cost of a data breach has increased, where 2021 saw the highest average cost of a data breach in 17 years, with a total of $9.05 million (£6.68 million), this increased from $8.64 million (£6.37 million) in 2020.

Average cost of a UK data breach

Although the cost of a data breach in the UK was above the global average, it was not above the US. Data breaches cost UK enterprises an average of £3.61 million ($4.89 million) per breach.

Sector breaches

The top five industries with the highest average total cost were Healthcare ($9.23/£6.81 million), Financial Services ($5.72/£4.22 million), Pharmaceuticals ($5.04/£3.72 million), Technology ($4.88/£3.60 million), and Energy ($4.65/£3.43 million). This is unsurprising, given the complex web of regulations healthcare and finance organisations need to adhere to. 

The public sector also saw a significant increase in data breach costs, increasing by 78.7% between 2020-2021 from $1.08 million (£0.80 million) to $1.93 million (£1.42 million). However, the public sector wasn’t only seeing cost increases; the retail, media, hospitality, and communications industries also had an increase in average data breach costs. 

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Remote Working

The report highlights that decentralised remote working environments increase the impact of data breaches considerably. Organisations that had more than 50% of their workforce working remotely took 58 days longer to identify and contain breaches than those organisations with 50% or fewer employees working remotely.

This indicates that organisations offering work from home opportunities to employees need to ensure that security best practices are maintained off-site, or they leave themselves at risk of encountering security incidents that are more difficult to contain.

Common Threats

The most frequent initial attack path identified were compromised credentials, accounting for 20% of breaches, followed by phishing attempts (17%), cloud misconfiguration (15%), and business email compromise (4%).

Although compromised credentials were the highest proportion of data breaches, they didn’t have the highest average cost. Business email compromise attackers were the initial attack vector with the highest overall cost, with an average cost of $5.01 million (£3.70 million).

The other threat vectors with the highest costs included phishing attacks, with an average cost of $4.65 million (£3.43 million), followed by malicious insiders at $4.61 million (£3.40 million), social engineering at $4.47 million (£3.30 million), and compromised credentials at $4.37 million (£3.22 million).

Average Breach Lifecycle

A breach lifecycle is a time between a data breach occurring and its containment.

In 2019, it took an average of 206 days to identify a breach and 73 days to contain it, amounting to a 279 day breach lifecycle.

In 2021, the average time to identify a breach is 212 days, and the average time to contain it is 75 days, totalling a 287 day breach lifecycle.

The faster a data breach is identified and contained, the lower the damage costs. Lifecycles less than 200 days were on average $1.26 million (£0.93 million) less costly than breaches with lifecycles greater than 200 days ($3.61/£2.66 million vs $4.87/£3.59 million).

Costs

The average UK cybersecurity budget is around $900,000 (£663,000), compared to an average of $1.46 million (£1.08 million) globally, according to Hiscox.

As the costs of data breaches continue to rise and threats become more difficult to contain, organisations need to adapt and invest in technologies and approaches that can optimise their incident prevention and resolution capabilities.

Taking steps such as investing in an incident response plan, implementing AI, automation, and creating a security team is key for decreasing the costs of security incidents in the future and for avoiding the devastation associated with lost business and reputational damage.

Want to find out how hiring for a security team can cut data breach costs? Contact our team today.

The rise of cyber-crime since COVID-19

The rise of cyber-crime since COVID-19

Cyberthreats are constantly evolving to take advantage of online behaviour and trends.

The global COVID-19 pandemic that hit every corner of the world forced us to reimagine our societies and reinvent the way we work and live. During the lockdown, we turned to the internet for a sense of normality: shopping, working and learning online at a scale never seen before.

Although the COVID-19 crisis showed us how criminals actively take advantage of society at its most vulnerable, this opportunistic behaviour of criminals should not overshadow the overall threat landscape. In many cases, COVID-19 has enhanced existing problems.

COVID-19 Crime

Social engineering and phishing remain effective threats to enable other types of cybercrime. Criminals use innovative methods to increase the volume and sophistication of their attacks, and inexperienced cybercriminals can carry out phishing campaigns more easily through crime as a service. Criminals quickly exploited the pandemic to attack vulnerable people; phishing, online scams and the spread of fake news became an ideal strategy for cybercriminals seeking to sell items they claim will prevent or cure COVID-19.

In 2020, the FBI saw 791,790 suspected Internet crimes, an increase of more than 300,000 compared to 2019. The top three crimes were, phishing scams, non-payment/non-delivery scams and extortion. The FBI says losses related to those crimes totalled more than $4.2 billion (£3.12 million). Between March 2020 to May 2021, the number of Internet crime complaints jumped from 5 million in 2017 to 6 million in 2020.

The UK’s cybersecurity agency had taken down more scams in 2021 than in the previous three years combined, with COVID-19 and NHS-themed cybercrime fuelling the increase. Seeing a rise in the removal of online campaigns compared with 2019, according to the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC). There was a jump in the number of phishing attacks using NHS branding to dupe victims, with the COVID-19 vaccine rollout used as a lure via email and text message to harvest people’s personal information for fraud. Forty-three fake NHS COVID-19 apps hosted outside of official app stores were also pulled.

However, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) remains the most copied brand used by fraudsters, totalling more than 4,000 campaigns, followed by the government’s gov.uk website, and TV Licensing. Overall, more than 700,500 campaigns were taken down, accounting for 1,448,214 URLs, the NCSC’s fourth active cyber defence report revealed.

Impact of COVID-19 on digital working and cybersecurity

The restrictions imposed by governments in response to the coronavirus pandemic have encouraged employees to work from home, and even ‘stay at home’. Consequently, technology has become even more important in both our working and personal lives. Despite this rise of technology need, it is noticeable that many organisations still do not provide a ’cyber-safe’ remote-working environment. Where business meetings have traditionally been held in-person, most now take place virtually.

The increase in remote working calls for a greater focus on cybersecurity, because of the greater exposure to cyber risk, where 47% of individuals fall for a phishing scam while working at home. Cyber-attackers see the pandemic as an opportunity to step up their criminal activities by exploiting the vulnerability of employees working from home and capitalizing on people’s strong interest in coronavirus-related news (e.g. malicious fake COVID-19 related websites). Another important consideration is that the average cost of a data breach resulting from remote working can be as much as $137,000 (£101,000).

Between February and May 2020 more than half a million people globally were affected by breaches in which the personal data of video conferencing users was stolen and sold on the dark web. Additionally, the City of London Police reported that since January 2020 more than £11 million ($14.81 million) have been lost due to COVID-19 scams.

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Best practices to employ

Employees working from home and organisations should implement essential cyber-secure practices, which include:

    • Antivirus protection – employees should be provided with a license to antivirus and malware software for use on their personal computers to eliminate low-level attacks
    • Cybersecurity awareness – employees should be briefed on best practices and procedures to regulate the sending of emails or other content to private email addresses and/or cloud storage
    • Phishing awareness – employees to be vigilant when receiving emails and should check the authenticity of the sender’s address
    • Home network security – employees to ensure that their home Wi-Fi is protected by a strong password
    • VPN – VPN add a further layer of protection to internet use from home. They cannot on their own be relied upon to prevent cyberattacks, but they can be a useful barrier against cyberattack
    • Identify weak spots – all systems have weaknesses, organisations should run tests to identify them and patch the most critical vulnerabilities as soon as possible. This can take the form of vulnerability scanning or various type of penetration testing exercises
    • Frequent reviews – Organisations to regularly evaluate cybersecurity risk exposure and determine whether existing controls are robust enough. Any new forms of cyberattack that have appeared recently should be considered during these reviews
    • Renew business continuity and crisis plans – managers need to keep their business continuity plans updated and consider cyberattack scenarios.

Areas that cyber teams can employ for high level cyber secure practices:

    • Zero Trust – CISOs and CIOs should consider implementing a zero-trust approach to cybersecurity. This is a security model where only authenticated and authorized users and devices are permitted access to applications and data. It challenges the concept of “access granted by default”
    • Risk management – organisations can apply governance, risk and compliance (GRC) solutions for improved risk management. GRC solutions provide a detailed view of the company’s risk exposure and help link together the various risk disciplines.

A new webinar series – Cyber Corner: Is It Time for Change?

A new webinar series – Cyber Corner: Is It Time for Change?

Via Resource are releasing a new webinar series, called Cyber Corner, where they gather industry experts in the Information and Cyber Security market. These 60-minute webinars are an opportunity to gain new industry knowledge, explore niche topics, debate current issues and address less talked topics. These topics cover a diverse range of disciplines including the full breadth of Information and Cyber Security but not limited to; Governance, Risk & Compliance, Security Engineering, Security Architecture, Penetration Testing, Cloud Security, Application Security, Security Operations & SOC, Data Protection & Privacy and many more related areas. 

Cyber Corner webinars provide the chance to work towards professional and personal development goals. As well as supporting individuals to ensure knowledge and skills stay relevant and up to date.

Each webinar will feature:

    • Expert knowledge from industry professionals
    • Opportunities to meet other like-minded individuals
    • A chance to join the conversation with a live Q&A
    • Webinars are 30 minutes with 30 minutes Q&A

The first Cyber Corner webinar discusses if it is time for change? Hosted by Steve Arnold, Senior Consultant at Via Resource and joined with Jay Jay Davey, SOC Lead at Cyberclan. Where they will be talking about ways in which the industry can change, what is needed to implement these changes, ways in which to progress through the industry without the need for certifications and how you can use Cyber Launchpad and Cyber Mentor Dojo to get your feet on the ladder and launch your career within Cyber Security (or alternatively if you are a hiring manager, find entry-level talent/graduates).

Overview of topics that will be discussed:

    • Areas that are needed to be changed within Cyber
    • How we can go about these changes
    • Government legislation about certifications
    • How Cyber Launchpad and Cyber Mentor Dojo can help
    • The organic journey through Cyber Security without chasing certifications
    • How people can transition from other areas of IT into Cyber Security

The free webinar is launching on Wednesday 16th March 2022 from 12pm till 1pm, and available to register here: https://bit.ly/3HWXowD 

Sign up now for the free webinar